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Azhdaya Ravenwolf
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From the Middle Ages through the Victorian period, flowers developed rich magickal associations and meanings that are still employed in everyday spells. The following are some suggestions for using spring flowers in your own magick:

Rose: Used in Love spells for centuries, the color of the rose often notes the precise meaning of the offering today. For example, red is for passion or romantic love, yellow is for friendship, white for chaste love, and pink for budding romance or to say you like someone a lot. To draw his or her attention your way, strew rose petals over an area where a targeted lover will walk . . .

Lilac: Lilacs can be added to oil blends that help you see your past lives. Anoint your temples and the area known as the third eye, just above and between your eyebrows, to get the best effect. Place them around your home to ward off evil spirits.

Primrose: Cultivate to attract spring fairies, and carry them to attract a highly- charged sexual love . . .

Cowslip: This is another favorite of spring fairies: they will gladly come to live in a garden in which cowslip is growing. Use it in spells for seeking wealth and health, and place near the front door when you wish to be left alone . . .

Violet: This early spring flower has many magickal uses. Add it to spells for protection, love, healing, and sleep. Place it under your pillow to attract a new lover to your bed . . .

Apple Blossom: Use in love spells and rituals to celebrate lifecycles. In Celtic mythology the apple is the symbol of the Otherworld and of the goddess who has control of the rebirthing process. Also, it is used to carry the Witches' hidden symbol . . .

Orange Blossom: Add to spells whose goal is not just love, but marriage. This doesn't have to be traditional mainstream marriage, but marriage as you see it is best for you and your partner. Carry at your own wedding to help make yours a sexy and sacred marriage in the image of the deities . . .

Daisy: Allow daisies to be a central feature of spells to attract love and lust. Don't forget the old folk custom of picking off the blooms of each daisy head while saying, "She o he loves me so" to divine whether someone you love loves you back . . .

Hawthorn: This is the ultimate fairie plant, and in Ireland many people will not disturb a hawthorn bush in any way, knowing it is the home of fairies who can help or hinder. Tie wishing ribbons to hawthorn bushes so that friendly fairies can assist you in making them come true. Be sure to leave an offering or libation for them too . . .

Columbine: Add to spells for love. Wear them when you need to fortify your courage or willpower . . .

Crocus: Add in spells to attract love and use to adorn Ostara altars . . .

Jasmine: Use jasmine in spells for love, psychic dreams, and to help find needed cash . . .

Daffodil: Use daffodils to honor the God and Goddess of Spring, to enhance both their fertility and your own. Use them in wishing charms and love spells . . .

Flowering Trees also have their place among the symbols of Ostara and Easter:

The pink blossoms of the dogwood tree have been symbolic of the resurrection of Jesus, just like the lily . . .

Apple blossoms speak of love and new life . . .

 

Hawthorn blossoms begin to bud in England and Ireland around  Ostara, and at  Beltane t hey are collected as magickal and sexual talismans . . .

In the Celtic tree calendar it is the alder tree – which is connected with psychic and regenerative powers - that rules over the month of Ostara . . .

The natural foods craze has moved into the twenty first century with  edible flowers  as its latest fad. I admit to having done little experimentation in this area, partly due to allergy concerns and partly due to persistent conviction that I'd like eating most flowers as much as I would dry grass. Even though modern North Americans and western Europeans are just now discovering edible flowers, flower foods have a long history in China and southwest Asia, and they are also eaten by Greeks and Romans . . .

 

The edible part of the flower, in these cases, is always just the blossoms of flowering petals. Flowers you plan to eat should never be purchased from a florist or nursery. These are covered with pesticides and other chemicals that are toxic. It should go without saying that you should also not eat any flower that you cannot positively identify . . .

 

 

Some of the most attractive and best smelling flowers are poisonous, including daffodils, azaleas, lily of the valley, crocuses, rhododendrons, and oleander . . .

 

The flowers in the ''edible'' category are:

 

Pansy

Violet 'sweet tasting'

Rose 'fresh and sweet'

Nasturtium 'sweet and peppery'

Gladiola 'tastes like lettuce'

Carnation 'peppery'

Dianthus 'clove like taste'

Calendula 'spicy'

Squash Blossom 'sweet'

Lilac 'lemony taste'

Marigold

Dandelion

Peach Blossom 'sweet'

Plum Blossom

Orange Blossom

Hibiscus

Geranium

Bachelor Button

Snapdragon 'can be bitter'

Jasmine 'sweet and earthy'

Gardenia 'sweet'

Angelica 'spicy'

Information source:

Ostara; Customs, Spells, and Rituals for the Rite of Spring by Edain McCoy

March 20, 2010 at 6:23 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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