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Forum Home > Try these Magyck Potions! . . . > Aphrodisiac Foods: Is Pork the New Viagra?

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
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Posts: 354

 

by Eric Steinman Feb 8, 2010

People love food, and what people love more than food is food that makes them love (or at least feel like loving). Around this time of year, with Valentine’s Day closing in, predictably people start looking around for desirable food items that generate desire, whether it be of the romantic or just carnal nature. Recently, (and this is an actual story with real quotes) Argentinean President Cristina Fernandez, in an effort to stimulate her nation’s pork producers, told a gathering at her Presidential Palace that pork is even better than Viagra for spicing things up in the bedroom. “I’d say it’s a lot nicer to eat a bit of grilled pork than take Viagra.” This revelation came to President Fernandez after a “high spirited” weekend spent with her husband, eating porcine Viagra, and letting pork lead the way. . . .

 

While I remain cynical of these claims and see them largely as pandering to the Argentinean pork lobby, I don’t doubt that some foods, while maybe not as potent as Viagra, will give rise to some pretty powerful emotions, namely amorous ones. . . .

These go by the name of aphrodisiacs (the name stems from Aphrodite, the goddess of love), and according to the Cambridge World History of food, they were first sought out as a remedy for various sexual anxieties including fears of inadequate performance as well as a need to increase fertility. . . .

Procreation was an important moral and religious issue (as it still is today) and aphrodisiacs were sought to insure both male and female potency. Nearly every food from artichoke to hippo snouts has been considered an aphrodisiac, but foods that are especially exotic or suggestive of certain body parts are particularly desirable as aphrodisiacs. Some examples of this are bananas, figs, and avocados, which were called the “testicle fruit” by Aztec’s because of their resemblance to well, you can figure it out. . . .

So this got me thinking about aphrodisiac foods as well as foods that could basically transform a romantic evening into an optimum night to clean out your fridge. Here is a partial list of aphrodisiac foods (some obvious, others not so much):

Figs:  Mainly because they are said to resemble the female genitalia. A man breaking open a fig and eating it in front of his lover is said to be a powerful erotic act.

Almonds:  A longstanding symbol of fertility, the smell of almonds is said to arise passion in women.

Basil:  It is said that this herb is used to increase sex drive as well as boost fertility.

Vanilla:  The scent of vanilla is said to increase lustful feelings.

Arugula:  Arugula has been a well-documented aphrodisiac since the first century AD.

 

Oysters:  Supposedly oysters are known to change their sex from male to female and back again, lending to their mystique as well as sexual ambiguity.

. . . And there are dozens more. Some of them universal, while others are idiosyncratic and personal in nature. Also, while there is no known database for the anti-aphrodisiac, I would like to get one going here with three submissions of my own (you add the rest):

~ French Onion Soup

~ Kettle Corn

~ Kraft American Singles

. . . Feel free to share with us your aphrodisiac food suggestions, as well as experiences. Have you ever actually felt the transformative power of an aphrodisiac? Is there a food-brain connection that facilitates this, or is it simply the power of suggestion? Enlighten and enliven us.

 

Eric Steinman is a freelance writer based in Rhinebeck, N.Y. He regularly writes about food, music, art, architecture and culture and is a regular contributor to Bon Appétit among other publications.

 

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/aphrodisiac-foods-is-pork-the-new-viagra.html?&page=2

February 9, 2010 at 6:25 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

 

~ Vanilla Figs and Dried Cherries ~

Adapted from Not Your Mother's Slow Cooker, by Beth Hensperger et al (Harvard Common Press, 2007)

What more romantic dessert could there be than one of figs and red cherries? Add to the charm that you can make Vanilla Figs and Dried Cherries in a slow cooker so it takes almost no work, and it is a perfect dish for Valentine’s Day. . . .

Tart dried cherries balance the sweet nature of the figs. You can use any manner of dried fig, whether they are black or green, moist or dehydrated. This dessert is a snap and only takes three to four hours on low in a slow cooker. . . .

 

INGREDIENTS:

2 cups water

½ to ¾ of a whole vanilla bean, split in half but halves left attached at the end

½ cup mild honey

¼ cup Sucanat or sugar alternative (see Care2’s Directory of Natural Sweeteners)

½ pound whole dried figs

1/3 cup dried tart cherries

1 recipe Rum Whipped Cream (recipe follows) . . .

1. Combine the water, vanilla bean, honey, sugar, figs, and cherries in the slow cooker. Cover and cook on LOW until the figs are soft, three to four hours. . . .

2. Turn off the cooker, remove the lid, and let cool a bit before serving warm or at room temperature with the whipped cream. Or transfer to an airtight container, refrigerate, and serve cold. You may store in the refrigerator for up to one week. . .

Serves 6 . . .

Rum Whipped Cream:

1 cup cold heavy cream

2 tablespoons Sucanat (see above)

2 tablespoons golden rum

½ cup full-fat sour cream . . .

 

1. Place a medium-size bowl and the beaters of an electric mixer in the freezer for at least one hour to chill thoroughly . . .

2. Combine the heavy cream, sugar, and rum in the chilled bowl. Whip on high speed with an electric mixer until soft peaks form, about 3 minutes. Fold in the sour cream. Serve immediately, or cover and refrigerate for up to six hours before serving . . .

 

Makes 2¼ cups. . . .

 

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/vanilla-figs-and-dried-cherries.html

 

 

February 9, 2010 at 6:35 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

~ Figs with Sherry and Vanilla ~

Adapted from The Every Day Gourmet by Michael Malkoff (Inner Traditions, 1999)

There is something undeniably sensuous and appealing about figs, and it’s good to know that they are also rich in iron and calcium. Here they are paired with vanilla, a traditional ingredient of romantic deserts, and flavorful sherry to make a rich, creamy finale to the Valentine dinner . . . Simple to make: . . .

INGREDIENTS:

1/2 pound dried figs

2 cups cream sherry (or more as needed)

1 whole vanilla bean, split lengthwise . . .

1. Place figs and split vanilla bean in a saucepan and cover with sherry . . .

2. Bring to a boil and reduce to a slow simmer. Simmer figs 30 to 40 minutes, adding extra sherry if the figs absorb all of the liquid, until soft and tender to the touch . . .

 

3. Serve hot or cold, alone or over vanilla frozen yogurt or ice cream.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/figs-with-sherry-and-vanilla.html

 

February 9, 2010 at 6:39 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

~ Organic/Orgasmic Valentine’s Day Cocktails ~

by Veronica Peterson

I don’t know about you, but for me Valentine’s day is not about a $200 bottle of wine or a dinner reservation that took months to get, but instead, a festive ritual meant to be spent with the one (or ones) you love in whatever way you chose to celebrate each other . . .

Of course, nothing adds to the merriment like an organic cocktail made just for the occasion. Newlyweds Jay Esopenko and Melissa Gugni, owners of Drink Event Bartending in San Francisco, have designed a couple especially for us. Enjoy! . . .

Love Potion #12:

2 oz. organic 100% pomegranate juice

1 1/2 oz. Square One organic vodka

1/2 blood orange squeezed

1/2 lime squeezed

1/4 to 1/2 oz. simple syrup (1/2 raw sugar–1/2 water dissolved)

. . .Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice, shake vigorously for 10 seconds and strain into a cocktail glass. Float 3 fresh cranberries for garnish . . .

Raspberry Bliss (non alcoholic):

 

6 organic raspberries

2 sprigs of fresh organic thyme

1/2 organic Meyer lemon

1/2 oz. simple syrup (1/2 raw sugar–1/2 water dissolved)

3 oz. sparkling water

. . . Remove the leaves from one sprig of thyme and add with 5 raspberries to a shaker. Muddle. Add lemon juice, simple syrup and ice. Shake vigorously for 10 seconds and strain into a hi-ball glass filled with ice. Top with sparkling water and garnish with a raspberry and sprig of thyme.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/organic-valentines-day-cocktails.html

 

 

February 9, 2010 at 7:07 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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