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Azhdaya Ravenwolf
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Posts: 354

~ ARTHIRITIS RELIEF: Tea Recipe ~

Adapted from Natural Hand Care by Norma Pasekoff Weinberg (Storey Books, 1998)

This pleasant-tasting, simple to make tea contains two arthritis-busting herbs: devil’s claw, from the Kalahari Desert, seems to be especially helpful for rheumatic complaints, with anti-inflammatory and mild analgesic properties with a cortisone-like action for stiff joints. Celery seed helps to counter acid in the blood. . . .

Be sure to share this recipe with your friends or parents who may be arthritis sufferers . . .

INGREDIENTS PER ONE-CUP SERVING:

1/2 to 1 teaspoon dried rhizome of devil’s claw, crushed

1 teaspoon celery seed

1 cup boiling spring water

DIRECTIONS:

1. Boil the herbs in the spring water for 15 minutes. Strain.

2. Drink 2 cups per day. Keep it up for a month to judge if it is effective in reducing your arthritis pain.

CAUTION:  This tea is not suggested during pregnancy or for those with gastric or duodenal ulcers.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/arthritis-relief-tea.html

November 21, 2009 at 12:46 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

 

~ ARTHIRITIS EXERCIES To Alleviate Pain ~

Q:  I have been trying to deal with arthritis for a few years. It is mostly in my hands and neck. I take fish oil, MSM, tumeric, minerals, eat a diet very low in animal fats, lots of whole grains. One cup of coffee a day. Anything you can suggest that I am not currently doing? . . .

A:  While I can’t necessarily argue with any of the interventions you are currently using, the one glaring omission from your list is exercise. . . .

Exercise has been shown to alleviate pain from osteoarthritis even better than some pain medications. Strengthening the muscles around affected joints helps to stabilize the joint, off-load pressure and reduce pain. . . .

A good exercise for the hands is to fill the sink or bathtub with warm water, hold a rolled up washcloth in your fist, submerge your hands and squeeze on the cloth as if you are trying to squeeze the water out of it. You can also do this with a ball of clay or therapeutic putty. . . .

If you haven’t already, ask your physician for a referral to a physical therapist who can teach you some good exercises for your neck and upper shoulders . . .

Dr. Brent Ridge is the health expert for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. You can call and ask him a question live every Tuesday at 2 p.m. Eastern on Sirius Satellite Radio, Channel 112 (1.866.675.6675).

. . . You can also follow along as he learns to grow his own food and raise goats on his farm in upstate New York by visiting

http://www.beekman1802.com

 

November 21, 2009 at 12:51 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

~ Don’t Let Arthritis Prevent Exercise ~

Q:  A friend of mine just sent me your advice about exercise and arthritis. I guess she thought I might need it although I am a nurse. But being a nurse does not necessarily make me any smarter than anyone else and when it comes to my health I am rather stupid! I have had psoriatic arthritis for over 15 years and up until recently was doing great. In the last two years I have developed some additional problems that go along with having a very over active immune system. . . .

My question to you is: While exercise is obviously a good thing, it can be very painful for me and the affected joints are my hands, back, hips and feet. I am a very young 55 and walk like I am 155! So along with a diet, I imagine mine is not the best, can you recommend any exercises or therapy. I am on Celebrex and Enbrel, but apparently they are not holding me any longer and I refuse to take any additional drugs! . . .

Oh I think what you are doing with the goats is awesome! You are living my dream. I always wanted to make my own goat cheese! . . .

 

A:  People have often said that doctors make the worst patients. Perhaps you are extending that to nurses, too. Like everyone else, just because we know what’s best for us doesn’t mean we do it. . . .

Exercise is the best therapy for arthritis, and as your muscles become stronger and support your joints better, exercising will become easier and your joint pain less. But you have to start somewhere. If walking is too painful, then find a pool and do some water aerobics (check at your local YMCA). Yoga is also a good starting point. If you are self-conscious to walk into a class, then start with a DVD. Gaiam.com has a very good selection for people at all levels. . . .

Funny that you mention the goats. Someone was telling me the other day that their grandmother swore that drinking goat milk helped her arthritis. As far as I know, there’s no scientific proof of this. . . .

Dr. Brent Ridge is the health expert for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia. You can call and ask him a question live every Tuesday at 2 p.m. Eastern on Sirius Satellite Radio, Channel 112 (1.866.675.6675).

. . . You can also follow along as he learns to grow his own food and raise goats on his farm in upstate New York by visiting

http://www.beekman1802.com

 

November 21, 2009 at 12:55 AM Flag Quote & Reply

Azhdaya Ravenwolf
Site Owner
Posts: 354

~ Anti-Arthritis Dog Stew ~

Adapted from The Veterinarians' Guide to Natural Remedies for Dogs,by Martin Zucker.

“I believe acupuncture is the number one method for arthritis. Number two is homeopathy. … Years ago I learned about a special arthritis diet…many animals improve on this diet alone.”—A. Greig Howie, DVM

The Antiarthritis Diet:

2 cups brown rice

2 cups barley (pearls)

1 cup lentils

2 cups carrots

1 cup celery

1/2 cup parsley

2 cups spinach

2 cups lamb or beef hearts

2 garlic cloves

8 to 12 cups water

. . . Combine ingredients in a large pot. Bring to a boil and then simmer covered for 1 1/4 hours. Stir every fifteen minutes. Add more water as needed.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/the-antiarthritis-diet.html

 

November 21, 2009 at 12:57 AM Flag Quote & Reply

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